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Stan Hilton, an unlikely warrior

When ninety-four year old David Lomon died just before Christmas 2012, he was almost certainly the last of the volunteers from the Spanish Civil War still to be alive in Britain. While his former comrade from London, Geoffrey Servante, was known to be alive a few years ago living in the Forest of Dean, no word has been heard for some time, so it seems all too probable that he too is, sadly, no longer with us.

Former British volunteer Stan Hilton
Former British volunteer Stan Hilton

There is, though, still one British veteran who is still very much alive and well. However he no longer lives in Britain, but in Australia. In Yarrawonga, to be precise, just over 200km north of Melbourne, on the border between Victoria and New South Wales. It’s a long way from his birthplace of Newhaven (looking at the map, it’s a long way from anywhere).

Not much is known about ninety-five year old Stan Hilton, and much of what we do know is a little vague. In order to find out more, he was tracked down by the film maker David Leach, who wrote and produced the 2001 documentary, Voices from a Mountain. The film includes interviews with a number of British volunteers: John Dunlop, Sol Frankel, Jack Jones, George Wheeler and Alun Williams. It also has an unforgettable score, a beautiful reworking of the famous song from the civil war, Ay Carmela. I’m pleased to say that the documentary can still be watched on Youtube.

According to what he told David, Stan was nineteen when he jumped from his ship, the S.S. Pilson in Alicante in November 1937, after hitting an officer who’d been pushing him around. While the former ship’s steward apparently recalled little of his time in Spain, he did remember assaulting another officer he had taken a dislike to. He also described how, contrary to his and many other volunteer’s perceptions, Spain was by no means always sunny. In fact, ‘It was freezing. I was always bloody cold,’ he recalled.

We know from documents held in London and Moscow that, following a period of training with the British Battalion, Stan became caught up in the chaotic Republican retreats which resulted from Franco’s colossal offensive in the spring of 1938. With the Republican army in disarray and communications having essentially broken down, Stan ended up swimming across the River Ebro to evade being captured (or worse) by Franco’s soldiers, before deciding that he had had enough of the Spanish war. In March 1938, with the British captain’s permission, he boarded the SS Lake Lugano at Barcelona, and sailed for home.

Stan Hilton reacquainting himself with Spain
Stan Hilton reacquainting himself with Spain

During the Second World War Stan served in the British Merchant Navy and, after demobilisation, took the decision to emigrate to Australia with his young family. And there he remained.

Stanley Gordon Hilton is now ninety-five years of age. He is also, as David Leach will testify, still alert, fit and healthy. They say that the struggle keeps you young and it certainly seems to be the case with Stan. Which struggles, however are not entirely clear. As David Leach explained, although English-born, Stan has always possessed a traditional Australian attitude towards authority:

‘I liked mucking about,’ Stan recalled over a glass of red wine at home in Yarrawonga. ‘I didn’t like being ordered around.’

Comments

Michael MacGregor
Reply

Just came across this interesting page through google. I had opened an International Brigade magazine two summers ago and seen an article on Stan. My partner and I- she was brought up in Tasmania- are going to Australia again in Saturday. We fly home from Melbourne and our family party are saying it is difficult to plan getting up to Yarrawonga in the time we have. Nevertheless, I have ordered a secret t- Shirt saying ‘I’m going to Yarrawonga’…and fully plan to be shaking the hand of this brave volunteer. Any suggestions you may have about contacting Stan would be very welcome.

rbaxell
Reply

Dear Michael, Your best bet would be to email Jim Jump, Secretary of the IBMT (secretary@international-brigades.org.uk) who will pass on a message to the family. I think they (and he) are all now based in Melbourne. Good luck!

Neil Stevenson
Reply

Are these photos of Stan Hilton yours, Richard ? Please could we use them on The Telegraph website ? Thanks…

rbaxell
Reply

The photographs are owned by the IBMT and taken by David Leach. You are welcome to use them, though please credit therm: David Leach / IBMT.
Likewise, feel free to use my material, as long as you cite it!

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